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  • Layla Auer

How Does Systematic Kinesiology Work With Physiotherapy?

Updated: Mar 3

I am interested in how physiotherapy and kinesiology work well together for personal and professional reasons. In 2003 I was run over on a zebra crossing in London, breaking multiple bones, which meant I needed a year of physiotherapy. Since retraining as a Systematic Kinesiologist I am intrigued by how a combination of approaches could have supported my journey to recovery.

My partner is a physiotherapist and we often sit and discuss the similarities and differences between our approaches. We can see that there is great potential for us to combine our knowledge and experiences to support people’s health and wellbeing.



What is physiotherapy?


The definition of physiotherapy is that it ‘helps people affected by injury, illness or disability through movement, exercise, manual therapy, education and advice.’ There are many different forms of physiotherapy than those that we may typically imagine. For example, if you are a post-stroke patient you would see a neurological physio. If you suffer from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or asthma you would get support from a respiratory physio. If you have had prolapse post-childbirth then you would be referred to a women’s health physio. If you have broken your arm, you would see a musculoskeletal physio.


The main aim of a physiotherapist is to help you regain movement and mobility, relieve pain and restore physical function as much as possible.

What is Systematic Kinesiology?



Systematic Kinesiology is a natural health care system that combines chiropractic principles with ancient Chinese wisdom. Through non-invasive muscle testing, the body’s responses communicate to the practitioner and client areas in need of support and ways of bringing the body and mind back into balance. You might see a kinesiologist if you were experiencing, for example, recurring back pain, digestive issues, skin problems, exhaustion, joint aches and many other issues.


The main aim of a kinesiologist is to restore your physical and emotional wellbeing by supporting you in the journey to take your health and recovery into your own hands.

What are the similarities between physiotherapy and Systematic Kinesiology?


A few decades ago, physiotherapy changed the way it understood people’s health and their recovery process. The profession began to adopt the Biopsychosocial Model of Health. This model showed a new way of understanding because it recognised that no two people are the same.


According to this model, the cause or outcome of the ill health of an individual is due to a combination of biological, psychosocial and social factors. Biological factors include things such as genetics, disability and immunity. Psychosocial factors include things such as personality, beliefs and behaviours and social factors are things such as culture, relationships and socioeconomic status.


Therefore, rather than a one size fits all approach to understanding health, illness and health care delivery, a patient’s recovery plan must take into consideration these different factors in order to have the potential of having a meaningful impact.


Systematic Kinesiology is a holistic method that, like the Biopsychosocial model, understands that there might be many factors combined that affect your health and wellbeing. Systematic Kinesiology focuses on mental, physical, chemical and energetic factors.


Therefore, rather than a one size fits all approach to understanding health, illness and health care delivery, a patient’s recovery plan must take into consideration these different factors in order to have the potential of having a meaningful impact.


Systematic Kinesiology is a holistic method that, like the Biopsychosocial model, understands that there might be many factors combined that affect your health and wellbeing. Systematic Kinesiology focuses on mental, physical, chemical and energetic factors.





Mental includes things that affect your emotional wellbeing, such as stress, self-esteem and confidence. Chemical includes things such as nutritional deficiencies, allergies and sensitivities. Physical includes any issues such as injury, aches and pains. Energetic includes the acupuncture system of meridians that comes from thousands of years of Chinese wisdom that Western medicine is only just catching up on.





A case study


A male client in his early forties came to see me experiencing lower back pain which was sometimes so bad he was unable to walk for days. His physical health presented no cause for concern due to levels of fitness, diet and medical history. He was regularly seeing a physiotherapist who was providing invaluable insight, professional expertise and advice. However, physiotherapy was not supporting him to address the emotional triggers that came before periods of acute pain.


Together, the client and I were able to identify how his divorce was a key factor in his physical wellbeing and explore a treatment plan that complemented the exercises provided by his physiotherapist. He now no longer suffers from lower back pain and has a range of coping mechanisms to promote his physical and emotional wellbeing.


Why do the two approaches work well together?


Although the models that underpin each method are similar in many ways, there are some key differences. I think what is really exciting is the potential for partnership working where physiotherapists and Systematic Kinesiologists work together to provide the potential for a long-lasting recovery process for those in need.


If you would like to find out more about how kinesiology can help you then book a free 20min discovery call



References

1. https://www.csp.org.uk/

2. The International College of Applied Kinesiology (ICAK) defines the method as ‘a safe and non-invasive diagnostic system […] for evaluating neurological function.’ ICAK goes on to say that Applied Kinesiology ‘focuses primarily on neuromuscular function as it relates to the structural, chemical and neurological regulatory mechanisms. Muscle testing assesses the impact of the nervous system on patient health, helping Applied Kinesiologists look for the source of disease in the balance of the sensory system with the motor system.’ Applied Kinesiology is known as Systematic Kinesiology in the U.K. https://www.icak.com/

Photography Credit - Sanchabella Photography

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